new artist Mario Sauceda

Born into a multi-racial family in 1960, and raised in Southwest Denver, Mario Sauceda’s creative force was manifested at an early age. Even as young as three or four, he exhibited a determination and an ability to concentrate that established a precedent for his later explorations into both art and architecture. His mother was an art teacher in Denver Public Schools, and his father was a civil rights attorney. His home environment gave him both the necessary freedom to experiment, and provided a variety of early learning experiences that supported his creativity. In Junior High School, he won two 1st place awards from the Women in Construction Architectural Design Competition for Youth in America, and two honorable mentions. In High School, Mario won the Denver Public School’s Multi-Media Portfolio award, which is the highest honor for achievement in art in the district, and exhibited at the Denver Art Museum in 1978. During an independent study in college, he spent time at his family ranch in New Mexico, and entered a juried art show at Stables Gallery in Taos, and became part of the Taos 20, a traveling show that included such well-known artists as R. C. Gorman and Fritz Shoulder. In 1984, he won a commission to do 10 painting for the Solar Energy Research Institute (later to become the National Renewable Energy Laboratory) in Golden, Colorado. Between 1980 and 1995, Mario pursued a broad, far-reaching career as an artist, showing his work in over 50 galleries around the country, and selling his work to collectors around the world.

After a licensing conflict soured him on dealing with galleries and agents, Mario turned to other interests, pursuing a career in the healing arts and martial arts. After a 15 year hiatus, during which he produced only 12 paintings, he returned to painting in 2011 with a new vision. Switching from acrylic to oils, he has been creating close to 100 paintings a year for the past 5 years. Mario’s present works are an exploration of a variety of subjects, moving from plein air landscapes to abstracts.

Artist’s Statement: “I depend more on the stroke of the brush than I do on the accuracy of the line. My works move from impressionist and expressionist to visionary.

Current Artist Live Music at La Cour